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Inquiry Into Beheadings By Militia: Ashraf Ghani

Inquiry Into Beheadings By Militia: Ashraf Ghani

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Kenya: Plans to lower age of consent face opposition

21.12.2016 - AA

NAIROBI, Kenya

Government plans to lower the age of consent from 18 to 16 are drawing opposition in the east African country of Kenya.

Critics say the proposed amendment to the country’s Sexual Offenses Act would exacerbate such problems as teenage pregnancy, female genital mutilation (FGM), and child marriages.

Proponents counter that current law penalizes consensual relationships among underage peers, and especially the males involved. Such young men may be accused of rape even where the female partner consented, even though legally she is unable, they say.

In a statement, Kenya’s Federation of Women Lawyers condemned the proposal, saying that it contradicts the state’s marriage laws, which set 18 as the minimum age of marriage.

According to UN figures cited by Childs Not Brides, a global umbrella group working against child marriages, 4 percent of girls in Kenya are married by age 15, and 23 percent by age 18, but opponents of the measure argue lowering the age of consent could worsen those figures.

Though official polls on the issue are lacking, Kenyans on social media and on the street have also voiced disapproval of the proposal, which has already gone through its first reading in Parliament and is expected to be either rejected or accepted before Dec. 25.

Dorcas Njeri, 35, a primary school teacher, told Anadolu Agency she feared lowering the age of consent would lead to more teenage pregnancies, especially because under the country’s education system, 16-year-olds are still early in their secondary school education.

“I strongly condemn and rebuke this nonsense,” she said.

“A 16-year old girl is in her second year in high school, she hasn’t even learned about reproduction, she is vulnerable. This law will just raise the rate of early marriages and teenage pregnancies in Kenya,”

“It shouldn’t become law,” she added.

Njeri also predicted the change would lead to more school dropouts, as more and more girls get pregnant before finishing high school.

John, a constitutional lawyer who declined to give his last name, complained that the new law would infringe on girls’ rights.

“For instance, this young girl who isn’t yet mature gets pregnant, and she can’t get married until she is of legal age, which is 18, it’s in the Constitution, so it’s the law,” he said.

“Why would politicians subject the girl child to this then if they aren’t willing to also ensure that the girls are married?”

He added, “The same way a person under 18 can’t legally gamble or join the army is the same way that this shouldn’t see the light of day.”

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This site contains photos of brutality. Semantically and philosophically speaking, the photos are not brutal. What is brutal is the depicted reality.

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Here’s What Actually Happens When You Wake Up During Surgery Let’s talk about the bizarre thing that can happen on the operating table.

BuzzFeedNews

1. It's a clinical phenomenon called anesthetic awareness.

'Anesthetic awareness, also known as intraoperative recall, occurs when a patient becomes conscious during a procedure that is performed under general anesthesia, and they can recall this episode of waking up after the surgery is over,' Dr. Daniel Cole, president-elect of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, tells BuzzFeed Life. Patients may remember the incident immediately after the surgery, or sometimes even days or weeks later. But rest assured, doctors are doing everything they can and using the best technology available to make sure this doesn't happen.

2. One to two people out of 1,000 wake up during surgery each year in the United States.

"It's not a huge number, but it's enough people that it's definitely a problem," says Cole. Plus, the true rate could be even higher. "The data is all over the place because it's mostly self-reported." "Ideally, the anesthesiologist would routinely see the patient post-operation and ask them about intraoperative awareness," he says. But this opportunity is often lost because patients are discharged or choose to go home as soon as they can after surgery. "Even if they remember three, five days later, they might feel embarrassed and don't want to make a big deal so they don't mention it to their surgeon. So there can be underreporting of awareness."

3. It happens when general anesthesia fails.

General anesthesia is supposed to do two things: keep the patient totally unconscious or 'asleep' during surgery, and with no memory of the entire procedure. If there is a decreased amount of anesthesia for some reason, the patient can start to wake up. The cocktail of medication in general anesthesia often includes an analgesic to relieve pain and a paralytic. The paralytic does exactly what it sounds like — it paralyzes the body so that it remains still. When the anesthesia does fail, the paralytics make it especially difficult for patients to indicate that they're awake.

4. And it's not the same as conscious sedation.

Conscious sedation, sometimes referred to as "twilight sleep" is when you're given a combination of a sedative and a local or regional anesthetic (which just numbs one part or section of the body) for minor surgeries, and it's not intended to knock you out completely or cause deep unconciousness. It's typically what you would get while getting your wisdom teeth out, having a minor foot surgery, or getting a colonoscopy. With conscious sedation, you may fall asleep or drift in and out of sleep, but this isn't the same as true anesthetic awareness, says Cole.

5. Contrary to popular belief, it doesn't usually happen right in the middle of surgery.

"The anesthesiologist is very aware that this can happen and never relaxes or lets down their guard at any point during the surgery, no matter how long," says Cole. "Awareness tends to occur on the margins, when the procedure is starting and you don't have the full anesthetic dose or when you're waking up from anesthesia, because it's safest to decrease the amount of anesthesia very slowly and gradually toward the end." However, this also depends on the surgery and patient... which we'll get to in a little bit.

6. Patients often report hearing sounds and voices. "The most common sensation is auditory," says Cole. Patients will report that they were aware of voices, and even conversations that went on in the operating room — which can be especially terrifying if loud tools are involved. "If you look at the effects of anesthetics on the brain, the auditory system is the last one to shut down, so it makes a lot of sense."

And opening your eyes to see the surgeons operating on you? Basically impossible. "First of all, the anesthesia puts you to sleep, so your eyelids shut naturally. Even if you regain consciousness, the anesthesia still restricts muscle movement so your eyes will stay shut," Cole explains. "But there's still 10–20% eye opening when you sleep. So during surgery, we will cover the patient's eyes or tape them shut to prevent injury and keep the eyes clean."

7. Few patients experience pressure (and rarely pain) during anesthetic awareness.

Less than a third of patients who report anesthetic awareness also report experiencing pressure or pain, says Cole. "But that's still one too many, because the patient is kind of locked in and aware of what's happening to them but unable to move, which is terrifying." Typically, sufficient analgesic (pain reliever) is given, so that even if you wake up you won't feel pain. "More often, we use an anesthetic technique which includes a morphine-type drug to reduce pain. But this is really required for when the patient wakes up and they no longer have anesthetic so they are conscious and aware of pain," Cole says.

Even if the analgesic wears off, there should be sufficient anesthesia to keep the patient unconscious and pain-free. "It's rare. You'd have to both have insufficient anesthesia and insufficient pain medicine at the same time to feel prolonged pain during awareness," Cole says.

8. Anesthetic awareness can cause anxiety and PTSD.

"The potential psychological effects of awareness range greatly," says Cole. "It can cause anxiety, flashbacks, fear, loneliness, panic attacks — PTSD is the worse. It's been reported in a small minority of patients, but it can be very severe." says Cole. If doctors hear about someone having intraoperative awareness, they will try to get the person into therapy as early as possible, before memories can be embedded in a harmful or stressful way to patients. "If you were in the hospital for a week and on day two we heard that you woke up during surgery, we'd get a therapist in the same day. We always want to mitigate so we can try to reduce the severity of symptoms," Cole says.

9. It's most often caused by an equipment malfunction.

General anesthesia can either be given intravenously (where all or most is given through an IV) or more commonly as a gas, which you breathe in through a mask. If the equipment in either of these were to malfunction, and the anesthesiologist wasn't aware of it because the signal that gas is too low doesn't work, for example, then patients would stop receiving medication and start to wake up. Again, this is terrifying but rare.

"The anesthesia equipment is like an airplane," Cole says. "The anesthesiologist will do a pre-flight check and go over all equipment to make sure it works. But sometimes, that equipment can malfunction as short as an hour later so it won't show up before taking off." Likewise, there is equipment used to monitor the patient's vitals and brain activity, which can also fail to signal to doctors that the patient is waking up.

10. Less commonly, it's the physician or anesthesiologist's fault.

"Any time humans are involved, human error is always a possibility — but it’s more common that technology fails," says Cole. "Physicians and anesthesiologists are well-trained to look out for signs of awareness during surgery, which obviously includes any movement of muscles and changes in vitals." Since paralytics are often involved, doctors also closely monitor other signs like heart rate, blood pressure, tears, or brain electrical activity for any red flags. However, sometimes patients can be on medications that suppress the body's responses and inhibit the monitoring systems from effectively picking up warning signs of light anesthesia and awareness. These incidences can make it difficult to detect awareness, so physician anesthesiologists must closely watch an array of signs.

11. It is more likely to happen during surgeries that require "light" anesthesia.

Anesthesia also comes with risk factors, and can be harmful depending on the surgery or patient's risk. "Awareness can occur when there is too light of anesthesia, which we often do deliberately for high-risk situations," says Cole. According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists, high-risk surgeries include heart surgery, brain surgery, and emergency surgeries in which the patient has lost a lot of blood or they can easily go into shock. Or the patient may need a lower dose of anesthesia due to risk factors such as heart problems, obesity, a genetic factor, or being on narcotics or sedatives. "For instance, anesthesia depresses the heart, so a normal dose could be life-threatening to someone with heart problems," Cole explains.

"Sometimes you have to make a trade off," says Cole. "Would you rather have a high level of anesthesia which threatens your body's life functions, or a low level which ensures safety but increases the risks of waking up during the procedure?"

12. ...But if that's the case, your doctor will talk to you about it first.

Patients often feel better knowing that the decreased amount of anesthesia is for their own safety. "We tell the patient that there's an increased chance that you may hear some voices or fuzziness, but if it gets uncomfortable we can tell and will increase the dose," says Cole. "Patients are more understanding and happy when they understand that the risk of waking up is for their own safety."

Also, you should know that if you've had a previous incidence of awareness, that puts you at higher risk for another episode. Cole explains that in this case, doctors will spend a lot of time with the patient and anesthesiologist describing exactly what to expect, so that hopefully they won’t experience it again.

13. ALL THAT BEING SAID, the chances of this happening are slim, and medical professionals are doing everything they can to ensure that this does not happen.

According to Cole, it's always helpful to spend some time pre-operatively with the surgeon and physician anesthesiologist going over the procedure and how they'll get you through it safely and comfortably.

"I do something called 'patient engagement' and 'shared decision-making' so I can make sure the patient understands literally everything. Some patients don't want to talk about awareness because it will give them more anxiety, and they just trust us," says Cole. However, even if you aren't at risk, your doctors will be happy to answer any questions you have about anesthesia before the procedure.

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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Neurosurgeon plans to bring deceased BACK TO LIFE with pioneering BRAIN TRANSPLANT

DEAD people who have been cryogenically frozen could be brought back to life within three years - by having their brains transplanted into in a new body, a pioneering neurosurgeon has claimed.

Professor Sergio Canavero is preparing to perform the world's first successful head transplant this December and believes the first ever brain transplant is only a few years away from also becoming a reality.

Prof Canavero, director of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, said his team had made "massive progress" in experiments that "seemed impossible even as recently as a few months ago".

In an interview with German magazine Ooom, he said: "We are currently planning the world’s first brain transplant, and I consider it realistic that we will be ready in three years at the latest."

Despite the huge scientific and ethical implications of his work, Prof Canavero is pressing ahead with his ground-breaking plans, and has teamed up with Dr. Xiaoping Ren of China to carry out the world's first head transplant later this year.

The operation will be carried out at Harbin Medical University, northern China, and the patient will be Chinese, Prof Canavero said.

The biggest barrier to a successful head transplant is reconnecting the brain to the severed spinal column, in order to control movement and sensation.

But Prof Canavero insisted: "This problem has now been solved."

He said his team had successfully restored mobility to mice that had had their spinal chords entirely severed using a fluid called Texas-PEG.

He added that many controlled studies on different animals had been conducted in South Korea and China and that the results were "unambiguous".

"The spinal cord – and with it the ability to move – can be entirely restored," he said.

Plans to perform the world's first brain transplant are already underway, the surgeon said.

Despite widespread scepticism in the scientific community, Prof Canavero said a brain transplant had "many advantages".

He said: ”First, there is barely any immune reaction, which means the problem of rejection does not exist.

"The brain is, in a manner of speaking, a neutral organ."

He said one problem was the brain would be hosted in an entirely different body, the impact of which remained to be seen.

Nevertheless, Prof Canavero said he hoped to bring back to life the first patients currently frozen at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Arizona.

Should he succeed in resurrecting the dead, Prof Canavero said the implications would permanently alter mankind's understanding of the world - and that religion "will be swept away forever".

He said: "They (religous beliefs) will no longer be necessary, as humans will no longer need to be afraid of death.

"They will know as a scientific fact that our consciousness – or whatever it is – survives death. We no longer need a Catholic Church, no Judaism and no Islam because religions in general will be obsolete."

By extension, the answer to the question "what is the meaning of life?" would also be redundant, the surgeon said.

"If we take hope out of life, out of the human equation, then what remains?," Prof Canavero explained.

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We are different. We, the adherents of Kreutz Ideology and Kreutz Religion, think that sex is the most important aspect in life. Everything else is just logistics.

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Surgery Offers Hope for Victims of Female Genital Mutilation

About 500,000 women in the United States have undergone genital mutilation. Surgery can restore some of their genital functions.

Can women who have lost the ability to experience sexual pleasure due to female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) ever regain it?

For some women, surgical treatments offer hope.

Dr. Marci Bowers is one of a few gynecologic surgeons who performs clitoral reconstruction surgery on women who have undergone FGM/C.

She primarily treats women who have undergone type 2 FGM/C, in which part or all of the external clitoris, labia minora, and sometimes labia majora are removed.

For many women who have undergone type 2 FGM/C, sex can be unpleasant or even painful.

“It can really diminish the desire for sexual contact,” Bowers told Healthline. “And after all, that’s kind of what it’s meant to do. It’s meant to control women’s sexuality.”

Clitoral reconstruction surgery can potentially help improve sexual function by repositioning the internal portion of the clitoris that remains intact.

“The surgery is really simple in its design,” Bowers explained. “It’s meant to uncover the clitoris, bring it forward, and then suture it into place so that it can be accessible during sexual contact.”

“The operation takes less than an hour,” she added. “The two keys to it are removing the scar tissue and releasing the suspensory ligament, which is the key component in allowing the clitoris to come down.”

While all surgeries pose some risks, Bowers reports high success rates.

“It works virtually every single time,” she said. “The woman’s [sexual] feelings are overwhelming improved when this is done.”

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 200 million girls and women who are alive today have undergone FGM/C.

About 500,000 of them live in the United States.

FGM/C includes any procedure that intentionally alters or injures female genital organs for nonmedical purposes.

It is performed as a cultural practice in many communities around the world, particularly in parts of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia.

In the United States, performing FGM/C on a minor or transporting them to another country to undergo the procedure is a federal crime.

Last month, the first federal case involving FGM/C was filed in Michigan.

Dr. Jumana Nagarwala, an emergency room physician, stands accused of performing the procedure on two 7-year-old girls.

Charges have also been filed against Dr. Fakhruddin Attar and Farida Attar, who are accused of assisting Nagarwala. Attar owns a medical clinic in Michigan where the procedures were reportedly performed.

While all three defendants are members of the Dawoodi Bohra, a Muslim sect based in India, FGM/C is a cultural practice that crosses religious lines.

“If it was a Muslim or religious practice in general, then all Muslim women would have to undergo it, and that’s not the case,” Haddijatou Ceesay, a program coordinator for Safe Hands for Girls, a nonprofit organization led by survivors of FGM/C, told Healthline.

FGM/C is practiced by members of some Muslim, Christian, and Jewish communities.

FGM/C is widely considered a human rights violation.

It has no known health benefits and many risks.

In the short term, it can cause bleeding, infection, and even death.

In the long term, it can lead to many chronic health problems.

“Girls and women can end up with painful periods, difficulty urinating, a really difficult time having sex,” Ceesay said. “A lot of them end up having a lack of sexual sensation. It can cause infertility, difficulty giving birth, and obstetric fistulas. It can also lead to PTSD, depression, and anxiety for some.”

Given the wide-ranging effects that FGM/C can have, Ceesay suggested that multiple types of care and support are often needed.

Dr. Jasmine Abdulcadir, a gynecologist in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), Switzerland, agreed.

Abdulcadir operates an outpatient clinic for women who have undergone FGM/C. She also conducts research and acts as a WHO consultant.

“If you want to promote sexual health, you need to focus not just on a woman’s genitals, but on her whole person. On her mind and body,” she told Healthline.

Although Abdulcadir has conducted clitoral reconstruction surgeries on some patients, she warned that more research is needed on the safety and efficacy of the procedure.

She added that surgery is not always the best approach.

“We do a lot of health education and counseling because many of the women who request clitoral reconstruction still have a functional clitoris but don’t realize it,” she said. “Many of them don’t know much about their own anatomy, and after being exposed to messages about the negative effects of FGM, they assume they can’t experience sexual pleasure.”

She suggested that the needs of many patients are better met through education and counseling, rather than surgery. For those who do undergo surgery, additional follow-up care may be needed.

“A multidisciplinary approach is really important, not only for deciding whether surgery is needed, but also for providing follow-up care,” she said. “The genital pain caused by reconstructive surgery can recall the pain of genital cutting and traumatic memories from a woman’s past.”

To help prevent future cases of FGM/C, Abdulcadir and organizations like Safe Hands for Girls emphasize the importance of community education.

“Turning survivors into advocates of ending FGM is a huge thing that we’re working on,” Ceesay said. “For a lot of them, it gives them a sense of inspiration and empowerment, knowing that they’re able to help stop the next generation from going through what they went through.”

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Ageism is pest of rich countries. If you are old you have no value. In poor countries, value depends on wealth. That is much better than value depending on youth because wealth can become more with advancing years. This is why rich men have every reason to invest in destruction. Plain math.

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Locked-in syndrome: rare survivor Richard Marsh recounts his ordeal

The Guardian

When Richard Marsh had a stroke doctors wanted to switch off his life-support – but he could hear every word but could not tell them he was alive. Now 95% recovered, he recounts his story

Two days after regaining consciousness from a massive stroke, Richard Marsh watched helplessly from his hospital bed as doctors asked his wife, Lili, whether they should turn off his life support machine.

Marsh, a former police officer and teacher, had strong views on that suggestion. The 60-year-old didn't want to die. He wanted the ventilator to stay on. He was determined to walk out of the intensive care unit and he wanted everyone to know it.

But Marsh couldn't tell anyone that. The medics believed he was in a persistent vegetative state, devoid of mental consciousness or physical feeling.

Nothing could have been further from the truth. Marsh was aware, alert and fully able to feel every touch to his body.

"I had full cognitive and physical awareness," he said. "But an almost complete paralysis of nearly all the voluntary muscles in my body."

The first sign that Marsh was recovering was with twitching in his fingers which spread through his hand and arm. He describes the feeling of accomplishment at being able to scratch his own nose again. But it's still a mystery as to why he recovered when the vast majority of locked-in syndrome victims do not.

"They don't know why I recovered because they don't know why I had locked-in in the first place or what really to do about it. Lots of the doctors and medical experts I saw didn't even know what locked-in was. If they did know anything, it was usually because they'd had a paragraph about it during their medical training. No one really knew anything."

Marsh has never spoken publicly about his experience before. But in an exclusive interview with the Guardian, he gave a rare and detailed insight into what it is like to be "locked in".

"All I could do when I woke up in ICU was blink my eyes," he remembered. "I was on life support with a breathing machine, with tubes and wires on every part of my body, and a breathing tube down my throat. I was in a severe locked in-state for some time. Things looked pretty dire.

"My brain protected me – it didn't let me grasp the seriousness of the situation. It's weird but I can remember never feeling scared. I knew my cognitive abilities were 100%. I could think and hear and listen to people but couldn't speak or move. The doctors would just stand at the foot of the bed and just talk like I wasn't in the room. I just wanted to holler: 'Hey people, I'm still here!' But there was no way to let anyone know."

Locked-in syndrome affects around 1% of people who have as stroke. It is a condition for which there is no treatment or cure, and it is extremely rare for patients to recover any significant motor functions. About 90% die within four months of its onset.

Marsh had his stroke on 20 May 2009. Astonishingly, four months and nine days later, he walked out of his long-term care facility. Today, he has recovered 95% of his functionality; he goes to the gym every day, cooks meals for his family and last month, he bought a bicycle, which he rides around Napa Valley, California, where he lives.

But he still weeps when he remembers watching his wife tell the doctors that they couldn't turn off his life support machine.

"The doctors had just finished telling Lili that I had a 2% chance of survival and if I should survive I would be a vegetable," he said. "I could hear the conversation and in my mind I was screaming 'No!'"

Locked-in syndrome is less unknown than it once was. The success of the 2007 film, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, the autobiography of the former editor of French Elle magazine editor, Jean-Dominique Bauby, brought awareness of the condition to the general public for the first time.

Then in June, Tony Nicklinson challenged the law on assisted dying in England and Wales at the High Court as part of his battle to allow a doctor to end a life he said was "miserable, demeaning and undignified". Judgment was reserved until the Autumn.

Marsh, however, did something almost unheard of: he recovered. On the third day after his stroke, a doctor peered down at him and uttered the longed-for words: "You know, I think he might still be there. Let's see."

The moment that doctor discovered Marsh could communicate through blinking was one of profound relief for Marsh and his family – although his prognosis remained critical.

"You're at the mercy of other people to care for your every need and that's incredibly frustrating, but I never lost my alertness," he said. "I was completely aware of everything going on around me and to me right from the very start, unless when they had me medicated," he said.

"During the day, I was really lucky: I never spent a single day when my wife or one of my kids wasn't there. But once they left, it was lonely – not in the way of missing people but the loneliess of knowing there's no one there who really understands how to communicate with you."

The only way for Marsh to sleep, was to be medicated. That, however, only lasted four hours, after which there had to be a three-hour pause before the next dose could be administered.

In questions submitted by Guardian readers to Marsh ahead of this interview one asked about his experience of his hospital care while the staff did not think he was conscious. Marsh said: "The staff who work at night were the newest and least skilled, and I was totally at their mercy. I felt very vulnerable. I did get injured a couple of times with rough handling and that always happened at night. I knew I wasn't in the best of care and I just counted the minutes until I would get more medicine and just sleep.

In response to another question, about the right-to-die debate, Marsh said he has no opinion. All he will say is: "I understand the despair and how a person would reach that point." But he is co-writing a book that he hopes will inspire hope and provide information to victims of locked-in syndrome and their families.

"When they first told my family that I was probably locked-in, they tried to find information on the internet – but there wasn't any. One of my goals now is to change that … to be able to reach out to families who find themselves in the same situation that mine were in so they can help their loved ones.

"Time goes by so slow ... It just drags by. I don't know how to describe it. It's almost like it stands still.

"It's a terrible, terrible place to be but there's always hope," he added. "You've got to have hope."

• This article was amended on 10 August 2012. The original said that Tony Nicklinson had failed in his High court bid to change the law on assisted dying in England and Wales. This has been corrected.

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Feminism, by creating artificial scarcity of sexual resources, is responsible for much of the deadly infighting among men, as well as male suicides.

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Ray J’s Comments About A Certain Part Of Kim Kardashian’s Body May Earn Him A Kanye Twitter Rant

Kanye West tore Wiz Khalifa a new one when he thought the Pittsburgh rapper was “coming out the side of his neck” and speaking ill on wife Kim Kardashian. Turns out, Wiz wasn’t, and the two have since made amends. But one can only imagine the epic Twitter rant Kanye’s going to go on after Ray J said his wife’s “ridiculous” vaginal odor acted as an “unbearable” penis repellent when they were together.

The R&B singer, who co-starred alongside Kim in Kim K Superstar and dated for three years in 2003, claims in a new interview that Mrs. West’s pH balance was so off at one point that he had to seek medical attention. “I went to the doctor and asked the doctor, ‘Is it me? Check me first. Okay, I’m good? What’s up with my girlfriend’s coochie?,’ ” he recalls in the interview that’ll surely piss Kanye off. “It’s ridiculous!”

Ray J says his doctor advised him to simply tell his then-girlfriend that her vagina “smells bad,” but he was so afraid of having the talk that he asked him to make the call instead. “C’mon, doc. You gotta give me something else. Can you call her because I can’t take this anymore.” The “One Wish” singer eventually found the courage to tell the reality star his concerns, which resulted in Kim immediately getting her problem fixed. “When I told Kim K, that was it. The next day, the p**** was fresh.”

The singer suspects Kim’s vaginal issues may have stemmed from her choice of clothing, or perhaps an STD, saying: “Most of the time it’s a yeast infection. A lot of the times, girls wear thongs with colors on them and it f**ks up something down there and brings about an odor [it messes with the pH]. Sometimes, the p***y stinks. Sometimes, you got an STD. Most of the times, when guys think p***y stinks, they think STD [and] dirty p***y.”

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Second-generation male Muslim immigrants have all reason to hate Europe. They can't get any girls here. Whatever they do. So it is an understandable reaction that they want to blow themselves up, and take a few along.

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ISIS Takes Page Out of the CIA’s Interrogation Manual, Validates Anti-Torture Activists’ Concerns

In the years since the September 11th terrorist attack and the start of the “war on terror,” the United States has become a country that openly admits to using “harsh” or “enhanced interrogation” methods on prisoners. Those who support these interrogation methods argue that they were necessary to gather information on terrorist groups (despite the complete lack of evidence supporting such a claim), while those who condemn the use of such interrogation methods have pointed out that they are illegal and set a bad precedent that could entice foreign groups to use “enhanced interrogation” on our troops.

Unfortunately, it appears that this bad precedent has finally emerged as a tangible threat to the American public; the Islamic State terrorist group (also known as ISIS and ISIL) which is currently rampaging across Iraq has begun using CIA-style “enhanced interrogation” on kidnapped westerners.

Defining Enhance Interrogation

“Enhanced interrogation” methods confirmed to have been used by the government include solitary confinement, waterboarding, superficial beatings (ex. slapping prisoners), exposure to extreme temperatures, prolonged stress positions, and blasting extremely loud music.

Not to mince words, these “enhanced interrogation” methods are torture—the term “enhanced interrogation” is simply a euphemism created by the Bush Administration to repackage the torture methods copied from a soviet-Chinese interrogation manual. In the past, we have condemned other nations for using solitary confinement and beatings on our prisoners of war, and have even executed several Japanese officers for the war crime of waterboarding American soldiers during WWII.

Repackaging torture under a different name may make it more palatable for an ill-informed American public, but it does nothing to preserve the US’s moral high ground. If we torture and commit war crimes, we lose the ability to credibly complain when other nations commit similar violations.

ISIS Using CIA Interrogation Methods

According to several European hostages who were ransomed from the Islamic State terrorists, their captors tortured them with beatings and waterboarding. In addition to their personal accounts, these hostages have described watching other prisoners get tortured via waterboarding, including American journalist James Foley, who was recently beheaded by the terrorist group. These accounts of waterboarding being used on Americans are the first such accounts in the years since the United States has begun using the torture method.

Ultimately, ISIS has demonstrated that it is an unspeakably vicious terrorist group that would almost certainly have water boarded its hostages, even if the US had not become infamous for the practice. They have buried women and children alive, burned captured adversaries at the stake, and even publically crucified allies who were seen as too moderate—to them, waterboarding is tame and there is no reason to believe that the US’s conduct had any effect on their decisions.

That said, the fact that we have publically claimed that waterboarding is not torture invalidates our ability to complain when ISIS decides to use it on our citizens. Any American to be captured by ISIS can expect to be waterboarded, only for ISIS to declare their torture to be “enhanced interrogation” no different from what the United States has subjected dozens of innocent Muslims to.

Put simply, if waterboarding is torture when ISIS does it to Americans, then it is torture when we do it to suspected terrorists—accordingly, if waterboarding, is just legal “enhanced interrogation” when we do it, ISIS has every right to avail itself of the tactic when extracting information from Americans.

The waterboarding of Americans by ISIS and the inability of our government to credibly respond with outrage is confirmation of the anti-torture argument that our use of torture entices others to torture our citizens. When Bush decided to start torturing (or, more likely, Cheney decided to use torture and Bush was simply dragged along for the ride) and Obama decided to let his predecessor’s acts go unpunished, they caused immense damage to our nation’s credibility to speak out against abuses on our citizens. We have dirtied our reputation and, unless we are willing to call out to torturers in our own ranks, we will have no right to demand that those who torture our countrymen be punished.

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For the current legal systems in the Western World, and for the mainstream media anyway, doing physical harm to men, or killing them, is peanuts. A woman who kills her sexual partner always gets full sympathy. Never mind what kind of bitch she is.

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